28
Feb

Euro-pe-niciline

Written on February 28, 2007 by Max Oliva in Corporate Responsibility, Development

J.Pozuelo-Monfort, MSc candidate in economic development at LSE
Jaime PM.jpg
World, where are you? World, where do you head off? World, how are you treated?
It is a tough life. It is a tough world. It is a tough world, particularly if you happen to be born on the developing side of the border, a developing side where four fifths of the world’s population live, a majority of which suffer from extreme poverty and inequality.
It is a tough life. It is a tough world. It is a tough world, particularly if you happen to live on the developing side of the border, a developing side with no opportunities whatsoever, no opportunities to develop, no opportunities to dream of a better future, no opportunities to wake up in the morning and think it is worth to make an effort because effort will lead to reward, reward will lead to welfare, and welfare will in the end lead to a better life and a better future.
It is a tough life. It is a tough world.
It could be a better life. It could be a better world. Another world is possible. Another word is possible.
The developed side of the border usually happens to be just a few miles north of the developing side of the border. That side that seems to only be concerned with its own daily routine, its own daily troubles, its own daily worries that maintain its own population away from the real problems the world faces, that maintain its own population away from the real worries the world faces, that stops its own population from realizing the world is on the verge of disaster.
A world that faces a challenging paradox. A world that has never seen so many opportunities to eliminate poverty and inequality. A world that needs a new social leader able and willing to set the pace of change.
Old Europe, where are you? Old Europe, who leads you? Old Europe, shall you react?


An Old Europe that has been able to forget the differences that have historically led to continued wars with no end but that in the imagination of a few dreamers. An Old Europe that in spite of its unification has, so far, been uncapable of waking up to the reality of a world with one single superpower. An Old Europe with a unique opportunity to become the leading voice of this first half of the XXIst century.
A new Europe arises from the generation that has experienced the reunification process. A new, stronger Europe arises from the trust its citizens have deposited in a New Constitution that will make it a true federal structure. A new Europe able to choose its own President and Ministers, able to set a new international agenda for the years to come. A new Europe able to set a new approach to politics, to international foreign policy. A new Europe capable to engineer solutions to the social challenges of the world.
A new Constitution must have a clear goal, must represent Europe in the new reality of a globalised world. A new Constitution must be designed to unite Europeans on the long run, to integrate Europe not only from a purely economic point of view, but from the deep roots of its social and political basis.
A new Constitution able to propose European Institutions with a global scope: a European President with the power to set a new international agenda, a European Foreign Ministry able to focus on the current problems facing the developing world, a European system of foreign representations and embassies able to merge the disproportionate size of the current representations and free up resources that could and must be utilized better, a European set of public goods able to take advantage of the sinergies created by the unification of the structures of its member states.
We have the responsibility to set the new pace of the world. We have the responsibility to lead a new world in which everybody talks to everybody under the premise that nobody is or has more influence or power.
We, Europeans, are considered a reference worldwide. Ask Asians, ask Africans, ask Latin Americans, Europe has been able to foster a welfare-state that many admire for its universal accesibility and availability. It is not only about exporting a successful system. It is about making the rest of the world hope for a better future. It is about making the world trust a new, emerging superpower.
But the reality is that in the current state of affairs, Europe is more a convenience club of many industrialized nations, than a true social cohesive structure able to rivalize with the overseas counterparty.
It is not as far as it would seem. But making a dream come true will require a vision of future that only a few have been granted the privilege to own.

Comments

No comments yet.

Leave a Comment

*

We use both our own and third-party cookies to enhance our services and to offer you the content that most suits your preferences by analysing your browsing habits. Your continued use of the site means that you accept these cookies. You may change your settings and obtain more information here. Accept